What the Tax Reform Legislation Means for Research

The GOP’s move to overhaul the tax system is moving quickly, with the House and Senate working in parallel on tax reform legislation. Before diving into the respective bills’ potential implications for scientific research, let’s first look at where we stand in the legislative process.

On Thursday, November 16, House Republicans passed their tax bill (H.R. 1) along party lines, 227-205, completing the first step in the budget reconciliation process. The bill, which passed with no Democratic support and 13 Republicans in opposition, will now go to the Senate for its consideration. The budget reconciliation instructions are significant because they will allow the Senate to pass the bill without Democratic support, if needed. (If you want to dive deeper, see this article from The New York Times.)

In the other chamber, the Senate is concurrently working on its own bill, one that greatly differs from that of the House. The Senate’s bill, after four days in markup, passed the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday via a party-line vote of 14-12. The full Senate is expected to take up the bill after Thanksgiving. (Read more from POLITICO.)

While the bills vary in terms of their provisions, which will need to be resolved during conference, both have consequences for research:

At the highest level, the first thing to note about both the House and Senate bills is that they are each expected to add roughly $1.5 trillion to the federal debt over the next 10 years. While the provisions within the bills are likely to shift as negotiations continue among and between the two chambers, this figure is unlikely to change. So, what does this have to do with research specifically? Recent history has shown that when there is an increase in the deficit, the subsequent move from Congress is to take steps to cut discretionary spending. Non-defense discretionary spending, which includes health care and health research, would likely take the bulk of that cut.  Continue reading

AADR Provides Input on Trans-NIH Strategic Plan for Women’s Health Research

In September, the Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released a Request for Information to solicit input from scientists and advocacy and patient communities on the trans-NIH Strategic Plan for Women’s Health Research. Specifically, ORWH was seeking feedback on three proposed cross-cutting themes and goals under consideration for the next iteration of the plan that is intended to promote allocation of NIH resources for conducting and support women’s health research across NIH Institutes and Centers.

For this reason, AADR wanted to stress to the ORWH that the cross-cutting themes and goals can and should be readily applied to oral and craniofacial health and disease research supported by NIH, and specifically by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and submitted a set of comments to this effect:

The American Association for Dental Research (AADR) appreciates the opportunity to provide input on the trans-NIH Strategic Plan for Women’s Health Research. We commend the Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) for putting forth the important cross-cutting themes in the Request for Information and believe they are an imperative step in ensuring that women’s health research is conducted and supported across NIH Institutes and Centers.

As such, we would note that the proposed themes and goals can and should be readily applied to oral and craniofacial health and disease research supported by NIH and specifically, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. In addition to the manifestations of sex-based differences in dental, oral and craniofacial diseases and conditions, which may be affected by hormonal changes, genetic variations and more, contextual factors and life experiences also play an important role in oral health – an integral component of overall health.

Additionally, as ORWH deliberates its approach to the science of women’s health, we would encourage ORWH to consider that, while the biologic implications of sex are both justified and important in basic or translational disease models, there is also opportunity for clinical investigators – particularly in the multi-dimensional approach to the science of women’s health – to highlight the socioeconomic and behavioral aspects of gender as well as biological sex. As noted by Ioannidou(1), “economic inequality and hardship for women have resulted in limited access to oral care. As a result, gender emerged as a complex socioeconomic and behavioral factor in influencing oral health and outcomes.” Expanding the strategic plan to encompass gender may lead to a greater understanding of the life-course and psychosocial dimensions sought after by ORWH as well as equip our system for better care by considering health disparities, gender bias and therapeutic interventions.

 

(1) Ioannidou, E.: The sex and gender intersection in chronic periodontitis. Frontiers in Public Health 2017 Aug 4;5:189.

AADR Showcases NIDCR-Funded Research at Second Annual Public Health Fair

For the second year, the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) was a proud co-sponsor and exhibitor at the Coalition for Health Funding’s (CHF) Public Health Fair, an event aimed at educating members of Congress and their staff about the value and importance of public health, including federally-funded public health research and programs. Representative Rob Wittman (R-VA) kicked off the event, stressing the importance of public health research in our society and sharing his belief that prevention efforts are the wisest way to use public health dollars.

  

During this event, held in the Rayburn House Office Building Foyer on November 8, organizations – ranging from professional associations to federal agencies – convened on Capitol Hill to demonstrate how they are collectively working to improve the health and well-being of the American people. Whether through promoting preventive care and community health initiatives, conducting surveillance to prevent and respond to disease, or collaborating with researchers to determine how to make health care safer and more effective for all, each of these groups has a role to play in our nation’s health.

This year, AADR and the Friends of National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial

The finished product of the 3-D printing technology displayed at the Public Health Fair.

Research (FNIDCR) were joined at our booth by Mr. Walter Zimbeck and Mr. Mark Kauf, two researchers from Technology Assessment & Transfer, Inc., a Maryland-based research and development company, who received an NIDCR grant to develop 3-D printing technology for the production of high performance ceramic dental crowns, which has the potential to lower material and processing costs as well as improve restoration aesthetics and performance.

In addition to a display of some ceramic dental crowns they had produced, Mr. Zimbeck and Kauf set up a 3-D printer at the AADR booth so attendees could see the printing technology in action. To learn how the technology works, check out CHF’s Facebook live video.

AADR was proud to be a part of this event and enjoyed learning about other organizations’ public health initiatives. For more insight into the Public Health Fair, view the Facebook live recaps here, and scroll through the day’s Twitter stream by searching the hashtag #PublicHealthFair.

To learn more about the Coalition for Health Funding, visit the CHF website. For more information about AADR’s advocacy and government affairs work, visit our website or contact Lindsey Horan at lhoran@aadr.org.